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Dating the First Vision (Part 2 of 9 John Pratt)

When did the First Vision take place? The late Dr. John Pratt says it was March 26, 1820. That calculation is based on the Enoch Calendar. We’re going to take a deep dive into calendar systems and find out how John came up with that date.

John:  So, in the grand years of 364, he’s born in the year–it should be called zero for astronomers. They call it 1 BC, but they had no zero. So, he’s born in the Year Zero, and then the years 364 and 728, you go up five of those, and it’s the year 1820. So, that’s why it’s such a massive big year and big day because it is it’s all the way from Christ and Christ is more than one of these years, too.  So, there you go.

GT:  Okay, so this is a really interesting.  So, you’re tying the birth of Christ into…

John:  Into the First Vision, exactly.

GT:  So, you think you’ve nailed the date as March 26, 1820?

John:  Well, it was all proposed until– and I can say it in a sentence, John Lefgren rides up on a white horse. [He’s] an independent researcher who finds two confirming things.  One, he finds weather reports that shows that March 26 was the best warm day of spring up in New England, when it was snowing on April 6. A lot of people have thought [that] well, he was probably born on April 6. [I mean] the First Vision, they thought might be on April 6.  It turned out it was very cold and not good weather that day. But, on March 26th, it’s the one day that had perfect, sunny weather. That’s why Joseph Smith would remember that. He said, “I don’t know what the day was, but it was a warm, clear spring day.” Well, yeah, and because it snowed the whole month after that, so he’s going to remember that. So, he has the weather reports and the first weather reports ever made, in the world, as far as he can figure out, was in the United States in that year 1820.

GT:  (Chuckling) If it had been 1819, we’d have been out of luck.

John:  You’re out of luck.  So, it’s 1820 and we’ve got the weather.

GT:  The army started tracking the weather, for awhile now.

John:  The weather [tracking] started with the army. The Surgeon General of the United States Army saying, “If we knew the weather, we could keep our soldiers healthier.” So, he took 14–now I’m going to try to do short answers. But, in 14 military stations around, he had people take the weather, and notice the wind and the rain and the temperature three times a day, 14 all around.

GT:  Like 7am, noon and then…

John:  Right, and so we have the weather reports. Number one, there’s confirmation that that was a warm, spring sunny day. This John Lefgren guy happens to be up in New England and he has a maple syrup business, where he makes maple syrup. He knows the process. It turns out by looking– Lucy Mack was the one that knew how to make maple sugar and maple syrup. It turns out that that weather pattern is exactly the day, the time when they would have been working hard doing maple syrup. The story is that Joseph had left his axe in the tree, and he goes to the grove to pray. He couldn’t have prayed on the Friday or the Saturday. But, then on Sunday, it’s the day of rest, and there’s no maple sugar running. You do that when it runs.  It has to do with temperature changes. So, he had two different, separate witnesses that the day was correct. So, that’s what made me think…

GT:  So, it has to do with the maple sugar runs, and that was a perfect day.

John:  It was a perfect day to be after the maple sugar runs were over, to have a day of rest, and it was clear and sunny. Those were confirming. If all it was my Enoch date, nobody would have cared, because they’d say, “Oh yeah, Dr. Pratt and his woo woo calendars. He thinks he knows the date.” But, when you have, “Wait a minute, there’s weather reports. If it’s not that date, what day was it?”  They’d say, “Oh, yeah, it snowed all through April, and this is New England.”

GT:  So, the idea is if you’re making maple syrup, you need a lot of changes in temperature for the sap to run.

John:  Changes, it’s got to go from cold to hot, and then the pressure change. Then you get about two days of that. But, the Sunday was the third day and it was from hot to hot, and there’s no change. So, nothing was running on Sunday, and incidentally you’re supposed to rest anyway, and a perfect day for him to go pray.

What do you think of John’s calculations and these weather reports.  Are they convincing?  Check out our conversation….

Dr. John Pratt calculates that the First Vision took plance on March 26, 1820.

Don’t miss our previous conversation with John!

586:  Dating Christ’s Birth

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