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Bo, Rowe, & Pontius: LDS Apocalypticists

We’re moving into modern day apocalypticism.  We’re going to talk about 3 main figures:  Bo Gritz, Julie Rowe, and John Pontius. Bo was former marine and Mormon convert who ran for president of the United States in 1992, receiving a significant number of votes in Utah.

Christopher:  Yes, absolutely. In the 1990s, Bo Gritz is a great representative, as well as guys like Jim Harmston, and others, of a Latter-day Saint who’s become concerned about New World Order conspiracy theories.  The United Nations, what role are they going to play in sort of setting up the scene for an anti-Christ figure and certainly our own distrust of the idea of the sort of global government? I just find that really interesting how Latter-day Saints turn in that direction as well. This is a moment where far right conservative, political ideas–John Birch Society is functioning in Utah and sometimes, John Birch Society isn’t far enough for some people in Utah County.

Julie Rowe currently has a YouTube channel where she shares her beliefs. John Pontius has written an influential book called Visions of Glory.

Christopher:  John Pontius wrote this book, “Visions of Glory,” which is Spencer’s story of his near death experience. Then there’s Julie Rowe, whose publisher Chad Daybell, helped her write several books about her experiences. Some people have wanted to say, the reason Spencer had so much more influence, particularly amongst mainstream Latter-day Saints, is because he was a man, Julie was a woman. I think that’s related to what’s going on here. But I actually think something else is going on here, because Spencer played the rules.  The rules are, you don’t want to become a celebrity, you’re not trying to build a following away from the Church. He makes himself anonymous.

His narrative is about how he actually had this vision and didn’t share it until God told him to.  He was friends with an apostle, and that apostle discouraged him from sharing it until he received revelation to do so.  His details are so thoroughly–I mean, it’s really a Last Days’ event, that is about the power of the church, like the church coming together. I mean, he plays by all these rules, but the most important rule he does is he doesn’t continue to write. He doesn’t show up in podcasts. He doesn’t have a website you can watch him. You can’t send him money for energy work.

Whereas Julie, and Julie would say, she’s received direction to do this. Part of her message is what she’s going to do. She’s going to be this general in a Last Days’ army, this nine-month war.  She needs to prepare camps and gather supplies for individuals. She wrote multiple books. She started a YouTube channel. You can pay her a significant amount of money to have energy work done.  I assume she’s doing it for the best of reasons, but she’s an entrepreneur. This is something that most Latter-day Saints would think is a little too close to being a paid preacher, or a little too close to being schismatic. So, I think it’s interesting to piece those two together, and think why would one be prosperous in these stories and one not? Ultimately, it’s interesting to me that these visionaries rise to popularity, and then they rise and fall. So, when one falls another shows up. I trace that most of these are based on near death experiences. So, I think it’s interesting that Betty Eadie, the first major near death experience writer who wrote her own book, was a Latter-day Saint.

Dr. Christopher Blythe will tell us more about these recent figures.  (We will focus on Chad in our next episode.)  Check out our conversation….

By the way, here is a link to Dr. Blythe’s book, Terrible Revolution.  It’s currently over 40% off, here’s your chance to get a good deal!  https://amzn.to/35hud6K

Bo Gritz, Julie Rowe, and John Pontius our modern-day LDS apocalypticists.

Don’t miss our other conversations with Dr. Blythe!

463: World Wars & Apocalypse

462: Civil War Prophecy & Joseph’s Apocalyptic Death

461: Mormon History of Apocalypse

460: Maxwell Institute: A Religious Thinktank

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*Why Remnant is Attractive (Part 7 of 7)

There are many people who are attracted to the Remnant Movement.  I asked Denver why that was, and if people practiced speaking in tongues like in the early days of the Church.

Denver:  Yes, the answer is yes. But the way in which its manifest itself is not something that we’ve done a lot to publicize, advertise or speak about. Signs generally attract the wrong sort of folk. So while there are abundant things that have and do take place, they’re not spoken openly too much because the wrong kind of people get attracted to that sort of stuff and we’re interested more in substantive, reflective, serious-minded people who are genuinely interested in trying to find and do the will of God.

Check out our conversation, but this episode is for newsletter subscribers only.  Subscribe to our free newsletter at https://GospelTangents.com/newsletter and I will send you a secret link to hear the conclusion!

Denver tells why people find the Remnant Movement attractive.

Don’t miss our previous conversations with Denver!

442: Remnant Movement is not a Church!

441: Ascension of Brigham Young

440: Why Denver Changed on Joseph’s Polygamy

439: Denver’s Outreach to Hebrews/Native Americans

438: Is Trinity in Lectures on Faith/Book of Mormon?

437: New Scriptures in Remnant Movement

 

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Remnant Movement is not a Church! (Part 6 of 7)

Denver Snuffer welcomes people to join his movement but emphasizes that the Remnant Movement is not a church!  How does that work?

GT:  Your movement is the Remnant Movement. That’s kind of the name.  Do you have an official name for your church?

Denver:  No, there isn’t a church. There isn’t a church, except in the sense that the church was defined in the revelation given to Joseph Smith. The Church that existed were people that repented, came into the Lord and were baptized. That’s it. That’s the definition of the Church. And that definition preceded the organization in April of 1830. There were at least three different congregations or fellowships of people that existed before the incorporation took place in April of 1830. All of them were considered members of Christ’s church because the definition was just repent, come unto me, be baptized in my name for remission of your sins.  If you’re going to say there’s a Church, that’s it.

We don’t require. I don’t require. I don’t know of anyone that says you have to leave the LDS Church to accept the work that God has got underway today. I have said, a Catholic priest could come and be baptized for the remission of his sins, accept the restoration and go on his way, and retain his status as a Catholic and a priest, if he chose to do so. Methodists can join. Latter-day Saints can join. There’s nothing to be done except have someone that has authority to baptize, baptize you. And then the name of the person, (because we’re required to keep track of the names,) has to be submitted to another volunteer who’s keeping what’s called the recorders clearinghouse. Those names get given to him. At the end of a year, all of the names are alphabetized, and they’re put in for that calendar year and they’re entered by hand into a book. There’s no electronic version. No one can hack it. No one can go online and get into it. There’s only one hand-written copy.

Check out our conversation….

The Remnant Movement is not a church.

Don’t miss our other conversations with Denver!

441: Ascension of Brigham Young

440: Why Denver Changed on Joseph’s Polygamy

439: Denver’s Outreach to Hebrews/Native Americans

438: Is Trinity in Lectures on Faith/Book of Mormon?

437: New Scriptures in Remnant Movement